David Smilde

WOLA Senior Fellow and the Charles A. and Leo M. Favrot Professor of Human Relations at Tulane University

David Smilde, curator of the blog, is a WOLA Senior Fellow and the Charles A. and Leo M. Favrot Professor of Human Relations at Tulane University. He has lived in or worked on Venezuela since 1992. Professor Smilde has researched Venezuela for the past twenty years. He has taught at the Universidad Central de Venezuela and the Universidad Católica Ándres Bello. From 2010-2012 he was the Chair of the Venezuelan Studies Section of the Latin American Studies Association. He is currently working on a book manuscript called Venezuela’s Transition to Socialism: Politics and Human Rights under Chávez, 2008-2012. He is co-editor of Venezuela's Bolivarian Democracy: Participation, Politics and Culture under Chávez (Duke 2011).

Posts by David

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1 min read

Documento de Trabajo: Los esfuerzos internacionales de construcción de la paz en el inextricable conflicto de Venezuela

Atravesando nuestro análisis es la idea de que es normal que un conflicto serio viera iniciativas multiples que surgen y se agotan, siendo reemplazado por nuevos esfuerzos. La clave es que se construyen sobre lo que ya ha ocurrido en lugar de comenzar de nuevo cada vez. Vemos este progreso en los cuatros procesos.

Jan. 4
4 min read

Q&A on the Coming Weeks and Months in Venezuela

In an electoral year, the Trump Administration has no motivation to alter the current situation. Having a deadlock in Venezuela will help them mobilize the electorate in South Florida and at the same time use Venezuela's governance disaster to stigmatize "socialism." This is the playbook that has served Republican so well for the past half century in Florida and the Venezuela conflict has provided it with new energy. Any kind of military intervention or significant diplomatic push would pose significant risks for Trump and are unattractive options compared to the status-quo.

5 min read

Venezuela Weekly: Small Victories and Big Challenges as Opposition Confronts Normalcy

The opposition’s current problems are indicators of a conjuncture in which they need to decide, on multiple fronts, whether they are a temporary parallel government that seeks to dislodge Maduro through maximum pressure in the short-term, despite the costs on the Venezuelan people and the inevitable scandals involved in working through improvised institutions; or whether they are going to seek sustainability and prioritize the well-being of the Venezuelan people by reaching some sort of modus vivendi with the Maduro government, despite the costs of tacitly recognizing it.