Amherst Venezuela Conference, Friday April 19th

Program below the break.

Venezuela: Change or Continuity?

The Legacy of Hugo Chávez & the Future of the Bolivarian Revolution

Friday April 19th, 2013

PROGRAM

Panel 1:  Media, Civil Society, Social Movements and Communal Power (8:45 am to 10:15 am)

Alejandro Velasco, Shades of Red: Prospects for Revolutionary Dissent Among Urban Social Movements After Chavez

Martha Fuentes-Bautista, Media and Communal Power: Promises and Contradiction of Media Democracy in Venezuela

Leonardo Vivas, Some Human Rights at the Expense of Others: The Case of Freedom of the Press in the Bolivarian Revolution

Moderator: Mark Overmyer-Velasquez, University of Connecticut

Panel 2: Foreign Policy & Political Economy (10:30 am to Noon)

Carlos Romero, Venezuela´s Foreign Policy: From the Past to the Future?

Mark Weisbrot, Haters Gonna Hate:  Why Reports of Venezuela’s Economic Demise Are An Exaggeration 

Miguel Tinker-Salas, Follow the Oil; Culture, Politics and Power in Post-Chávez Venezuela

Moderator: Ray La Raya, UMASS Amherst Political Science Department

Panel 3: Chavistas, Chavismo, and the Elections (1:30 to 3pm) 

David Smilde, Understanding Support for Chávismo: Rationality, Emotion and Inclusion 

Javier Corrales, Chavismo Compared:  The political status of Chavismo in Venezuela and elsewhere in Latin America

Jennifer McCoy, Venezuela in The wake of new presidential elections

Moderator: Cora Fernandez Anderson, Five College Andrew W. Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow

Panel 4: Assessing the Legacy of Chavez and the Future of the Bolivarian Revolution (3:15 to 5:30pm)

David Myers, Political Participation at the Local Level: Chavez’s Legacy and the Future

George Ciccariello-Maher, We Created Chávez, and Now He is Gone: Revolutionary Movements Facing the Future 

Francisco Monaldi, Oil and Politics in Venezuela: Chavez and Beyond

Margarita Lopez-Maya, Legacies and Challengers in Post-Chavez Venezuela

Moderator: Paulina Ochoa Espejo, Yale University, Department of Political Science